MachineMachine /stream - imported from en.wikipedia.org https://machinemachine.net/stream/feed en-us http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss LifePress therourke@gmail.com <![CDATA[Survivorship bias - Wikipedia]]> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Survivorship_bias

Survivorship bias or survival bias is the logical error of concentrating on the people or things that made it past some selection process and overlooking those that did not, typically because of their lack of visibility. This can lead to false conclusions in several different ways.

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Sun, 23 Feb 2020 12:37:24 -0800 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Survivorship_bias
<![CDATA[Wikipedia's Greatest Sex Illustrator Is an Anonymous Legend]]> https://gawker.com/wikipedias-greatest-sex-illustrator-is-an-anonymous-leg-1640516972

Take a look at the Wikipedia page for fisting. I'll wait. OK. Now check out pegging. When you're done there, have a gander at gokkun; after that, deep throating; and then maybe mammary intercourse, frot, tribadism, and tea bag (sexual act).

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Thu, 28 Feb 2019 15:54:23 -0800 https://gawker.com/wikipedias-greatest-sex-illustrator-is-an-anonymous-leg-1640516972
<![CDATA[Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot - Wikipedia]]> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energetically_Autonomous_Tactical_Robot

The Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot (EATR) was a project by Robotic Technology Inc. (RTI) and Cyclone Power Technologies Inc. to develop a robotic vehicle that could forage for plant biomass to fuel itself, theoretically operating indefinitely.

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Thu, 28 Feb 2019 15:53:10 -0800 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energetically_Autonomous_Tactical_Robot
<![CDATA[Spandrel (biology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]]> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spandrel_(biology)

In evolutionary biology, a spandrel is a phenotypic characteristic that is a byproduct of the evolution of some other characteristic, rather than a direct product of adaptive selection.

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Mon, 01 Feb 2016 04:27:28 -0800 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spandrel_(biology)
<![CDATA[Church of the SubGenius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]]> http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_the_SubGenius#section_1

The Church of the SubGenius is a "parody religion"[citation needed] organization that satirizes religion, conspiracy theories, unidentified flying objects, and popular culture.

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Tue, 10 Feb 2015 04:08:06 -0800 http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_the_SubGenius#section_1
<![CDATA[Betteridge's law of headlines]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betteridge%27s_law_of_headlines

Betteridge's law of headlines is an adage that states, "Any headline which ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no." It is named after Ian Betteridge, a British technology journalist,[1] although the general concept is much older.[2] The observation has also been called "Davis' law"[3][4] or just the "journalistic principle."[5] Betteridge explained the concept in a February 2009 article, regarding a TechCrunch article with the headline "Did Last.fm Just Hand Over User Listening Data To the RIAA?": This story is a great demonstration of my maxim that any headline which ends in a question mark can be answered by the word "no." The reason why journalists use that style of headline is that they know the story is probably bullshit, and don’t actually have the sources and facts to back it up, but still want to run it.[6] Five years before Betteridge's article, a similar observation was made by UK journalist Andrew Marr in his 2004 book My Trade. It was among Marr's suggestions for how a reader should approach a newspaper if they really wish to know what is going on: If the headline asks a question, try answering 'no.' Is This the True Face of Britain's Young? (Sensible reader: No.) Have We Found the Cure for AIDS? (No; or you wouldn't have put the question mark in.) Does This Map Provide the Key for Peace? (Probably not.) A headline with a question mark at the end means, in the vast majority of cases, that the story is tendentious or over-sold. It is often a scare story, or an attempt to elevate some run-of-the-mill piece of reporting into a national controversy and, preferably, a national panic. To a busy journalist hunting for real information a question mark means 'don't bother reading this bit'.[7] Betteridge has admitted to breaking his own law (writing a question headline with the answer "yes"), in an article published at his own site.[8]

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Sun, 02 Jun 2013 06:54:29 -0700 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betteridge%27s_law_of_headlines
<![CDATA[Otherkin]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otherkin

Otherkin are a community of people who see themselves as partially or entirely non-human. They contend that they are, in spirit if not in body,[2] not human. This is explained by some members of the otherkin community as possible through reincarnation, having a nonhuman soul, ancestry, or symbolic metaphor.[1] Scholarship has framed this claim as religious because it is frequently supported by a framework of metaphysical beliefs.[3] Not all otherkin necessarily share these beliefs; some may simply prefer to identify as non-human.

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Wed, 01 May 2013 14:02:59 -0700 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otherkin
<![CDATA[List of lists of lists - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_lists_of_lists

On this Encyclopedia, many lists themselves contain lists.

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Thu, 18 Apr 2013 16:54:25 -0700 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_lists_of_lists
<![CDATA[Wikipedia:Deleted articles with freaky titles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia%3ADeleted_articles_with_freaky_titles

Strange titles are rarely added to Wikipedia under the guise of real encyclopedia articles. Occasionally Wikipedians lose their minds (especially on April Fool's Day) and if their posts are good they wind up here. Silliness can come in the form of creativity, insanity, or just boredom. As with other

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Wed, 14 Nov 2012 04:52:00 -0800 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia%3ADeleted_articles_with_freaky_titles
<![CDATA[Deleted articles with freaky titles]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia%3ADeleted_articles_with_freaky_titles

Strange titles are rarely added to Wikipedia under the guise of real encyclopedia articles. Occasionally Wikipedians lose their minds (especially on April Fool's Day) and if their posts are good they wind up here. Silliness can come in the form of creativity, insanity, or just boredom. As with other "silly things", often it seems a shame to delete the best of this humor which has been submitted to us under the GFDL. Unlike bad jokes and other deleted nonsense, however, some of these article names were made for good reasons, on real topics that the writers thought might be useful for Wikipedia. That doesn't always mean that – out of context – the title will be any the less ridiculous-sounding. If you find an article with a strange title up for deletion at WP:AFD, consider this page. If you do add it to the list, simply put it in its correct alphabetical place. Please don't link it – it'll only encourage them. With any luck it should be a redlink anyway, although one or two of those listed now act as redirects to more sensible titles. As to this page's title, consider it a mild addition to the collection of "freaky" titles – the real reason for it was just so that it abbreviates to DAFT. Bewildering titles, bizarre titles, and surreal titles – all are equally fair game.

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Wed, 14 Nov 2012 04:50:46 -0800 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia%3ADeleted_articles_with_freaky_titles
<![CDATA[Ontogeny - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontogeny

Ontogeny (also ontogenesis or morphogenesis) is the origin and the development of an organism – for example: from the fertilized egg to mature form. It covers in essence, the study of an organism's lifespan. The word "ontogeny" comes from the Greek ὄντος, ontos, present participle singular of εἶναι,

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Mon, 17 Sep 2012 06:22:00 -0700 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontogeny
<![CDATA[Ontogeny]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontogeny

Ontogeny (also ontogenesis or morphogenesis) is the origin and the development of an organism – for example: from the fertilized egg to mature form. It covers in essence, the study of an organism's lifespan. The word "ontogeny" comes from the Greek ὄντος, ontos, present participle singular of εἶναι, "to be"; and from the suffix -geny, which expresses the concept of "mode of production".[1] In more general terms, ontogeny is defined as the history of structural change in a unity, which can be a cell, an organism, or a society of organisms, without the loss of the organization which allows that unity to exist.[2] More recently, the term ontogeny has been used in cell biology to describe the development of various cell types within an organism[3]. Ontogeny comprises a field of study in disciplines such as developmental biology, developmental psychology, developmental cognitive neuroscience, and developmental psychobiology. Within biology, ontogeny pertains to the developmental history of an organism within its own lifetime, as distinct from phylogeny, which refers to the evolutionary history of species. In practice, writers on evolution often speak of species as "developing" traits or characteristics. This can be misleading. While developmental (i.e., ontogenetic) processes can influence subsequent evolutionary (e.g., phylogenetic) processes[4] (see evolutionary developmental biology), individual organisms develop (ontogeny), while species evolve (phylogeny).

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Mon, 17 Sep 2012 06:02:21 -0700 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontogeny
<![CDATA[Thoughts on Wikipedia's Future]]> http://rhizome.org/editorial/2012/aug/1/thoughts-wikipedias-future/

“Very few people are being promoted into the humble, hard-working positions which make Wikipedia work.” - Robinson Meyer via The Atlantic Earlier this month Wikipedia held its annual summit in Washington, DC. Afterwards, The Atlantic summarized the event in an article outlining how Wikipedia is slowl

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Wed, 08 Aug 2012 02:51:00 -0700 http://rhizome.org/editorial/2012/aug/1/thoughts-wikipedias-future/
<![CDATA[Category:Body parts of individual people - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category%3ABody_parts_of_individual_people

Individual pieces of human anatomy which are famous in their own regard : #Wikipedia

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Wed, 08 Aug 2012 02:40:00 -0700 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category%3ABody_parts_of_individual_people
<![CDATA[Thoughts on Wikipedia's Future]]> http://rhizome.org/editorial/2012/aug/1/thoughts-wikipedias-future/

“Very few people are being promoted into the humble, hard-working positions which make Wikipedia work.” - Robinson Meyer via The Atlantic

Earlier this month Wikipedia held its annual summit in Washington, DC. Afterwards, The Atlantic summarized the event in an article outlining how Wikipedia is slowly running out of admins to edit the site’s content. A trend is emerging. Fewer people are applying, and the current editors are slowly leaving. The long-term future has a flicker of uncertainty. To spark some discussion, I surveyed four artists and writers about the decline. We can all speculate what effects a decline in editor participation will have on Wikipedia as a global knowledge-base, but what are the implications for artists who use it as a tool for research and making work?

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Wed, 01 Aug 2012 08:07:20 -0700 http://rhizome.org/editorial/2012/aug/1/thoughts-wikipedias-future/
<![CDATA[Titivillus]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titivillus

Titivillus was a demon said to work on behalf of Belphegor, Lucifer or Satan to introduce errors into the work of scribes. The first reference to Titivillus by name occurred in Tractatus de Penitentia, c. 1285, by Johannes Galensis, John of Wales.[1] Titivillus has also been described as collecting idle chat that occurs during church service, and mispronounced, mumbled or skipped words of the service, to take to Hell to be counted against the offenders.

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Fri, 13 Jul 2012 01:00:00 -0700 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titivillus
<![CDATA[Trap street]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trap_street

A trap street is a fictitious entry in the form of a misrepresented street on a map, often outside the area the map nominally covers, for the purpose of "trapping" potential copyright violators of the map, who will be unable to justify the inclusion of the "trap street" on their map. On maps that are not of streets, other "copyright trap" features (such as non-existent towns or mountains with the wrong elevations) may be inserted or altered for the same purpose.[1] Trap streets are often nonexistent streets; but sometimes, rather than actually depicting a street where none exists, a map will misrepresent the nature of a street in a fashion that can still be used to detect copyright violators but is less likely to interfere with navigation. For instance, a map might add nonexistent bends to a street, or depict a major street as a narrow lane, without changing its location or its connections to other streets.

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Sun, 16 Oct 2011 09:10:08 -0700 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trap_street
<![CDATA[Sacred Contagion]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_Contagion

Sacred contagion is the belief that spiritual properties within an object, place, or person may be passed to another object, place, or person, usually by direct contact or physical proximity. While the concept of sacred contagion has existed in numerous cultures since before recorded history, the term "sacred contagion" originated with French sociologist Émile Durkheim, who introduced it in his book The Elementary Forms of Religious Life.

An example of sacred contagion is chapters 11 through 15 in the Book of Leviticus found in the Bible and Torah. Leviticus specifies which animals are considered spiritually clean and unclean, and defines as unclean both women during menstruation and men after a nocturnal emission. The text gives many examples of sacred contagion brought about by contact with these spiritually unclean people and things.

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Fri, 12 Aug 2011 08:08:43 -0700 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_Contagion
<![CDATA[moodlegoodpractice - home]]> http://moodlegoodpractice.wikispaces.com/ ]]> Wed, 10 Aug 2011 17:53:00 -0700 http://moodlegoodpractice.wikispaces.com/ <![CDATA[Clinamen]]> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinamen

Clinamen is the Latin name Lucretius gave to the unpredictable swerve of atoms, in the atomistic doctrine of Epicurus. According to Lucretius, the unpredictable swerve occurs "at no fixed place or time": When atoms move straight down through the void by their own weight, they deflect a bit in space at a quite uncertain time and in uncertain places, just enough that you could say that their motion has changed. But if they were not in the habit of swerving, they would all fall straight down through the depths of the void, like drops of rain, and no collision would occur, nor would any blow be produced among the atoms. In that case, nature would never have produced anything.[1] This indeterminacy, according to Lucretius, provides the "free will which living things throughout the world have."[

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Thu, 07 Jul 2011 11:15:14 -0700 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinamen