MachineMachine /stream - tagged with additivist http://machinemachine.net/stream/feed en-us http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss LifePress therourke@gmail.com <![CDATA[Defying Daesh – with a 3D printer]]> http://additivism.org/post/158621742950

Defying Daesh – with a 3D printer In February 2015, when videos emerged of Daesh (ISIS) ransacking the Mosul museum in Iraq, Morehshin Allahyari decided to act. Operation Troll ISIS: inside Anonymous’ war to take down Daesh

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Mon, 20 Mar 2017 01:51:00 -0700 http://additivism.org/post/158621742950
<![CDATA[Centre Pompidou: quand les artistes impriment le monde en 3D«...]]> http://additivism.org/post/158472323339

Centre Pompidou: quand les artistes impriment le monde en 3D « Mutations/Créations », c'est le nom du nouveau rendez-vous annuel du Centre Pompidou-Paris. Une manifestation déroutante dédiée aux relations bouillonnantes entre les artistes et l’innovation technologique, entre l’art et la science.

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Thu, 16 Mar 2017 05:34:01 -0700 http://additivism.org/post/158472323339
<![CDATA[Singularities panel, Transmediale 2017]]> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fd1LHsnlVC8

With Luiza Prado & Pedro Oliveira (A parede), Rasheedah Phillips, Dorothy R. Santos Moderated by Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke

A singularity is a point in space-time of such unfathomable density that the very nature of reality is brought into question. Associated with elusive black holes and the alien particles that bubble up from quantum foam at their event horizon, the term ‘singularity’ has also been co-opted by cultural theorists and techno-utopianists to describe moments of profound social, ontological, or material transformation—the coming-into-being of new worlds that redefine their own origins. Panelists contend with the idea of singularities and ruptures, tackling transformative promises of populist narratives, and ideological discrepancies that are deeply embedded in art and design practices. By reflecting on Afrofuturism and digital colonialism, they will also question narcissistic singularities of 'I,' 'here,' and 'now', counter the rhetoric of technological utopias, and confound principles of human universality.

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Wed, 01 Mar 2017 06:10:50 -0800 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fd1LHsnlVC8
<![CDATA[New Art West Midlands Duncan Poulton visits Transmediale]]> http://additivism.org/post/157608924551

New Art West Midlands Duncan Poulton visits Berlin’s Transmediale 2017 Artist Duncan Poulton reflects on his recent research visit to Transmediale, a festival of digital art, culture and technology, and fringe events that took place in Berlin, 2 February – 5 March 2017. His visit was part funded by the New Art West Midlands Engine Micro Bursary scheme.

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Thu, 23 Feb 2017 04:35:00 -0800 http://additivism.org/post/157608924551
<![CDATA[Transmediale’s Revolution from Within]]> http://additivism.org/post/157523492477

Transmediale’s Revolution from WithinBenjamin Busch writes about the ‘alien matter’ exhibition at Transmediale, featuring The 3D Additivist Cookbook: Does agency lie in the human, the machine, or the mediation in between? Agency can be staked out in two concepts of freedom: a negative freedom-from (a refusal of things as they are) and a positive freedom-to (a refusal and simultaneously future-building project). The former entails resistance, even a claim to purity by refusing to participate in an unjust system. The latter entails refusal, but it also contains a recognition of contingency (“there is no outside”) as a means to construct an alternative future from within the entangled complex of the present.Transmediale, Berlin’s festival for art and digital culture, makes a case for the latter. Aptly titled ever elusive, the 2017 edition, its 30th anniversary, draws from the festival’s three-decade history while keeping its orientation toward the future. The theme of perpetual elusiveness picks up on expressed ambiguities between the human and nonhuman, which have become evermore intertwined. - Read the rest at ArtSlant

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Tue, 21 Feb 2017 02:43:00 -0800 http://additivism.org/post/157523492477
<![CDATA[The “3D Additivist Cookbook” guide to subversive makingThe “3D...]]> http://additivism.org/post/157321589314

The “3D Additivist Cookbook” guide to subversive making The “3D Additivist Cookbook” was launched at Transmediale in Berlin on January 31. About a hundred artists, makers and activists contributed to this book of 3D printing recipes and imaginative and provocative methods.

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Thu, 16 Feb 2017 10:08:00 -0800 http://additivism.org/post/157321589314
<![CDATA[Singularities panel, Transmediale (5th Feb 2017)]]> http://machinemachine.net/portfolio/singularities-panel/

Singularities panel, Transmediale (5th Feb 2017)The audio recording of our #Singularities panel at Transmediale is now online:Featuring the extraordinary talents of Luiza Prado & Pedro Oliveira (A parede), Rasheedah Phillips, and Dorothy R. Santos speaking (and performing) on refiguring techno-colonialist and heteronormative pasts, presents, futures and identities.The introduction to the panel - written by Morehshin and myself - can be found here. Photos from the panel are here.Stick around for the discussion and Q&A

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Thu, 16 Feb 2017 02:02:00 -0800 http://machinemachine.net/portfolio/singularities-panel/
<![CDATA[The 3D Additivist Cookbook (2017 update)]]> http://additivism.org/post/157061598866

The 3D Additivist Cookbook, 2017 EditionFollowing our European launch at Transmediale last week, The 3D Additivist Cookbook has been tweaked and minor errors have been corrected. DOWNLOAD THE 2017 EDITION NOW

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Fri, 10 Feb 2017 06:42:00 -0800 http://additivism.org/post/157061598866
<![CDATA[Rosa Menkman clipping from The 3D Additivist Cookbook]]> http://www.flickr.com/photos/r00s/32684751101/

Rosa Menkman

additivism.org

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Thu, 09 Feb 2017 12:55:34 -0800 http://www.flickr.com/photos/r00s/32684751101/
<![CDATA[Rosa Menkman clipping from The 3D Additivist Cookbook]]> http://www.flickr.com/photos/r00s/32684754741/

Rosa Menkman

additivism.org

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Thu, 09 Feb 2017 12:55:33 -0800 http://www.flickr.com/photos/r00s/32684754741/
<![CDATA[Transmediale 2017 (events)]]> http://machinemachine.net/text/ideas/transmediale-2017/

I just came back from two jam packed weeks at Transmediale festival, 2017. Morehshin Allahyari and I were involved in a wealth of events, mostly in relation to our #Additivism project. Including: On the Far Side of the Marchlands: an exhibition at Schering Stiftung gallery, featuring work by Catherine Disney, Keeley Haftner, Brittany Ransom, Morehshin and myself.

Photos from the event are gathered here.

The 3D Additivist Cookbook european launch: held at Transmediale on Saturday 4th Feb.

Audio of the event is available here.

Singularities: a panel and discussion conceived and introduced by Morehshin and myself. Featuring Luiza Prado & Pedro Oliveira (A parede), Rasheedah Phillips, and Dorothy R. Santos.

Audio of the entire panel is available here. The introduction to the panel – written by Morehshin and myself – can be found below. Photos from the panel are here.

Alien Matter exhibition: curated by Inke Arns as part of Transmediale 2017. Featuring The 3D Additivist Cookbook and works by Joey Holder, Dov Ganchrow, and Kuang-Yi Ku.

Photos from the exhibition can be found here.

 

Singularities Panel delivered at Transmediale, Sunday 5th February 2017 Introduction by Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke   Morehshin: In 1979, the Iranian Islamic revolution resulted in the overthrowing of the Pahlavi deen-as-ty and led to the establishment of an Islamic republic. Many different organizations, parties and guerrilla groups were involved in the Iranian Revolution. Some groups were created after the fall of Pahlavi and still survive in Iran; others helped overthrow the Shah but no longer exist. Much of Iranian society was hopeful about the coming revolution. Secular and leftist politicians participated in the movement to gain power in the aftermath, believing that Khomeini would support their voice and allow multiple positions and parties to be active and involved in the shaping of the post-revolution Iran. Like my mother – a Marxist at the time – would always say: The Iranian revolution brought sudden change, death, violence in unforeseen ways. It was a point, a very fast point of collapse and rise. The revolution spun out of control and the country was taken over by Islamists so fast that people weren’t able to react to it; to slow it; or even to understand it. The future was now in the hands of a single party with a single vision that would change the lives of generations of Iranians, including myself, in the years that followed. We were forced and expected to live in one singular reality. A mono authoritarian singularity. In physics, a singularity is a point in space and time of such incredible density that the very nature of reality is brought into question. Associated with elusive black holes and the alien particles that bubble out of the quantum foam at their event horizon, the term ‘singularity’ has also been co-opted by cultural theorists and techno-utopianists to describe moments of profound social, political, ontological or material transformation. The coming-into-being of new worlds that redefine their own origins. For mathematicians and physicists, singularities are often considered as ‘bad behaviour’ in the numbers and calculations. Infinite points may signal weird behaviours existing ‘in’ the physical world: things outside or beyond our ability to comprehend. Or perhaps, more interestingly, a singularity may expose the need for an entirely new physics. Some anomalies can only be made sense of by drafting a radically new model of the physical world to include them. For this panel we consider ‘bad behaviours’ in social, technological and ontological singularities. Moments of profound change triggered by a combination of technological shifts, cultural mutations, or unforeseen political dramas and events. Like the physicists who comprehend singularities in the physical world, we do not know whether the singularities our panelists highlight today tell us something profound about the world itself, or force us to question the model we have of the world or worlds. Daniel: As well as technological or socio-political singularities, this panel will question the ever narcissistic singularities of ‘I’, ‘here’ and ‘now’ – confounding the principles of human universality upon which these suppositions are based. We propose ‘singularities’ as eccentric and elusive figures in need of collective attention. It is no coincidence that ‘Singularity’ is often used as a term to indicate human finitude. Self-same subjects existing at particular points in time, embedded within particular contexts, told through a singular history or single potential future. The metaphor of the transformative Singularity signals not one reality ‘to come’, nor even two realities – one moved from and one towards – but of many, all dependant on who the subject of the singularity is and how much autonomy they are ascribed. The ‘Technological’ Singularity is a myth of the ‘transhumanists’, a group of mainly Western, commonly white, male enthusiasts, who ascribe to the collective belief that technology will help them to become ‘more than human’… ‘possessed of drastically augmented intellects, memories, and physical powers.’ As technological change accelerates, according to prominent Transhumanist Ray Kurzweil, so it pulls us upwards in its wake. Kurzweil argues that as the curve of change reaches an infinite gradient reality itself will be brought into question: like a Black Hole in space-time subjects travelling toward this spike will find it impossible to turn around, to escape its pull. A transformed post-human reality awaits us on the other side of the Technological Singularity. A reality Kurzweil and his ilk believe ‘we’ will inevitably pass into in the coming decades. In a 2007 paper entitled ‘Droppin’ Science Fiction’, Darryl A. Smith explores the metaphor of the singularity through Afro-American and Afrofuturist science fiction. He notes that the metaphor of runaway change positions those subject to it in the place of Sisyphus, the figure of Greek myth condemned to push a stone up a hill forever. For Sisyphus to progress he has to fight gravity as it conspires with the stone to pull him back to the bottom of the slope. The singularity in much science fiction from black and afro-american authors focusses on this potential fall, rather than the ascent:

“Here, in the geometrics of spacetime, the Spike lies not at the highest point on an infinite curve but at the lowest… Far from being the shift into a posthumanity, the Negative Spike is understood… as an infinite collapsing and, thus, negation of reality. Escape from such a region thus requires an opposing infinite movement.”

The image of a collective ‘push’ of the stone of progress up the slope necessarily posits a universal human subject, resisting the pull of gravity back down the slope. A universal human subject who passes victorious to the other side of the event horizon. But as history has shown us, technological, social and political singularities – arriving with little warning – often split the world into those inside and those outside their event horizons. Singularities like the 1979 Iranian revolution left many more on the outside of the Negative Spike, than the inside. Singularities such as the Industrial Revolution, which is retrospectively told in the West as a tale of imperial and technological triumph, rather than as a story of those who were violently abducted from their homelands, and made to toil and die in fields of cotton and sugarcane. The acceleration toward and away from that singularity brought about a Negative Spike so dense, that many millions of people alive today still find their identities subject to its social and ontological mass. In their recent definition of The Anthropocene, the International Commission on Stratigraphy named the Golden Spike after World War II as the official signal of the human-centric geological epoch. A series of converging events marked in the geological record around the same time: the detonation of the first nuclear warhead; the proliferation of synthetic plastic from crude oil constituents; and the introduction of large scale, industrialised farming practices, noted by the appearance of trillions of discarded chicken bones in the geological record. Will the early 21st century be remembered for the 9/11 terrorist event? The introduction of the iPhone, and Twitter? Or for the presidency of Donald J Trump? Or will each of these extraordinary events be considered as part of a single, larger shift in global power and techno-mediated autonomy? If ‘we’ are to rebuild ourselves through stronger unities, and collective actions in the wake of recent political upheavals, will ‘we’ also forego the need to recognise the different subjectivities and distinct realities that bubble out of each singularity’s wake? As the iPhone event sent shockwaves through the socio-technical cultures of the West, so the rare earth minerals required to power those iPhones were pushed skywards in value, forcing more bodies into pits in the ground to mine them. As we gather at Transmediale to consider ai, infrastructural, data, robotic, or cyborgian revolutions, what truly remains ‘elusive’ is a definition of ‘the human’ that does justice to the complex array of subjectivities destined to be impacted – and even crafted anew – by each of these advances. In his recent text on the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster Jean-Luc Nancy proposes instilling “the condition of an ever-renewed present” into the urgent design and creation of new, mobile futures. In this proposition Nancy recognises that each singularity is equal to all others in its finitude; an equivalence he defines as “the essence of community.” To contend with the idea of singularities – plural – of ruptures as such, we must share together that which will forever remain unimaginable alone. Morehshin: This appeal to a plurality of singularities is easily mistaken for the kinds of large scale collective action we have seen in recent years around the world. From the Arab Springs, and Occupy Movement through to the recent Women’s March, which took place not 24 hours after the inauguration of Donald Trump. These events in particular spoke of a universal drive, a collective of people’s united against a single cause. Much has been written about the ‘human microphone’ technique utilized by Occupy protesters to amplify the voice of a speaker when megaphones and loud speakers were banned or unavailable. We wonder whether rather than speak as a single voice we should seek to emphasise the different singularities enabled by different voices, different minds; distinct votes and protestations. We wonder whether black and brown protestors gathered in similar numbers, with similar appeals to their collective unity and identity would have been portrayed very differently by the media. Whether the radical white women and population that united for the march would also show up to the next black lives matter or Muslim ban protests. These are not just some academic questions but an actual personal concern… what is collectivism and for who does the collective function? When we talk about futures and worlds and singularities, whose realities are we talking about? Who is going to go to Mars with Elon Musk? And who will be left? As we put this panel together, in the last weeks, our Manifesto’s apocalyptic vision of a world accelerated to breaking point by technological progress began to seem strangely comforting compared to the delirious political landscape we saw emerging before us. Whether you believe political mele-ee-ze, media delirium, or the inevitable implosion of the neo-liberal project is to blame for the rise of figures like Farage, Trump or – in the Philippines – the outspoken President Rodrigo Duterte, the promises these figures make of an absolute shift in the conditions of power, appear grand precisely because they choose to demonize the discrete differences of minority groups, or attempt to overturn truths that might fragment and disturb their all-encompassing narratives. Daniel: The appeal to inclusivity – in virtue of a shared political identity – often instates those of ‘normal’ body, race, sex, or genome as exclusive harbingers of the-change-which-should – or so we are told, will – come. A process that theorist Rosi Braidotti refers to as a ‘dialectics of otherness’ which subtly disguises difference, in celebration of a collective voice of will or governance. Morehshin: Last week on January 27, as part of a plan to keep out “Islamic terrorists” outside of the United States Trump signed an order, that suspended entry for citizens of seven countries for 90 days. This includes Iran, the country I am a citizen of. I have lived in the U.S. for 9 years and hold a green-card which was included in Trump’s ban and now is being reviewed case by case for each person who enters the U.S.. When the news came out, I was already in Berlin for Transmediale and wasn’t sure whether I had a home to go back to. Although the chaos of Trump’s announcement has now settled, and my own status as a resident of America appears a bit more clear for now, the ripples of emotion and uncertainty from last week have coloured my experience at this festival. As I have sat through panels and talks in the last 3 days, and as I stand here introducing this panel about elusive events, potential futures and the in betweenness of all profound technological singularities… the realities that feel most significant to me are yet to take place in the lives of so many Middle-Easterners and Muslims affected by Trump’s ban. How does one imagine/re-imagine/figure/re-figure the future when there are still so many ‘presents’ existing in conflict? I grew up in Iran for 23 years, where science fiction didn’t really exist as a genre in popular culture. I always think we were discouraged to imagine the future other than how it was ‘imagined’ for us. Science-fiction as a genre flourishes in the West… But I still struggle with the kinds of futures we seem most comfortable imagining. THANKS   We now want to hand over to our fantastic panelists, to highlight their voices, and build harmonies and dissonances with our own. We are extremely honoured to introduce them: Dorothy Santos is a Filipina-American writer, editor, curator, and educator. She has written and spoken on a wide variety of subjects, including art, activism, artificial intelligence, and biotechnology. She is managing editor of Hyphen Magazine, and a Yerba Buena Center for the Arts fellow, where she is researching the concept of citizenship. Her talk today is entitled Machines and Materiality: Speculations of Future Biology and the Human Body. Luiza Prado and Pedro Oliveira are Brazilian design researchers, who very recently wrapped up their PhDs at the University of the Arts Berlin. Under the ‘A Parede’ alias, the duo researches new design methodologies, processes, and pedagogies for an onto-epistemological decolonization of the field. In their joint talk and performance, Luiza and Pedro will explore the tensions around hyperdense gravitational pulls and acts of resistance. With particular focus on the so-called “non-lethal” bombs – teargas and stun grenades – manufactured in Brazil, and exported and deployed all around the world. Rasheedah Phillips is creative director of Afrofuturist Affair: a community formed to celebrate, strengthen, and promote Afrofuturistic and Sci-Fi concepts and culture. In her work with ‘Black Quantum Futurism’, Rasheedah derives facets, tenets, and qualities from quantum physics, futurist traditions, and Black/African cultural traditions to celebrate the ability of African-descended people to see “into,” choose, or create the impending future. In her talk today, Rasheedah will explore the history of linear time constructs, notions of the future, and alternative theories of temporal-spatial consciousness.      

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Thu, 09 Feb 2017 08:50:26 -0800 http://machinemachine.net/text/ideas/transmediale-2017/
<![CDATA[Singularity is a weird sort of colonizer, it polishes dissent and pulls everything to its mouth]]> https://twitter.com/therourke/statuses/828613562910330881 ]]> Mon, 06 Feb 2017 06:37:22 -0800 https://twitter.com/therourke/statuses/828613562910330881 <![CDATA[Across & Beyond: Transmediale Reader]]> http://machinemachine.net/portfolio/across-and-beyond-transmediale-reader/

The 3D Additivist Manifesto, written by Morehshin Allahyari and myself, was published as part of the Across & Beyond: A Transmediale Reader in February 2017. This collection of art and theory analyzes today’s post-digital conditions for critical media practices—moving across and beyond the analog and the digital, the human and the nonhuman. The contributions also look across and beyond the field of media art, staking out new paths for understanding and working in the transversal territories between theory, technology, and art. The concept of the post-digital is a way to critically take account of, contextualize, and shift the coordinates of new technologies as part of contemporary culture. The post-digital condition is not merely a theoretical issue but also a situation that affects conceptual and practice-based work. The program of the transmediale festival in Berlin, celebrating its thirtieth year in 2017, has reflected these changes, and this book gathers new contributions from theorists and artists that have taken part in the festival program over its past five editions. Divided into the thematic sections Imaginaries, Interventions, and Ecologies, the book is not a document of the festival itself but a standalone volume that explores the ongoing themes of transmediale in a book format. across and beyond is developed as a collaboration between transmediale and Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton. With contributions by Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke, Jamie Allen and David Gauthier, Clemens Apprich and Ned Rossiter, Tatiana Bazzichelli, Benjamin Bratton, Florian Cramer, Dieter Daniels, Geoffroy de Lagasnerie, Daphne Dragona, Keller Easterling, Olga Goriunova, Louis Henderson, Geraldine Juarez, Olia Lialina, Alessandro Ludovico, Rosa Menkman, Julian Oliver and Danja Vasiliev, Erica Scourti, Cornelia Sollfrank, Telekommunisten (Baruch Gottlieb and Dmytri Kleiner), Tiziana Terranova, YoHa (Graham Harwood and Matsuko Yokokoji) You can read the introductory essay to the book, Across and Beyond: Post-digital Practices, Concepts, and Institutions, by Ryan Bishop, Kristoffer Gansing and Jussi Parikka. Developed by transmediale and Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton Edited by Ryan Bishop, Kristoffer Gansing, Jussi Parikka, Elvia Wilk Order your copy here or grab it at transmediale 2017 ever elusive. Please note: between 25 January and 6 February no copies will be sent out.

Publisher: Sternberg Press and transmediale e.V.

Design: The Laboratory of Manuel Bürger, Stefanie Ackermann, Manuel Bürger

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Thu, 02 Feb 2017 03:35:00 -0800 http://machinemachine.net/portfolio/across-and-beyond-transmediale-reader/
<![CDATA[Exhibist Magazine Issue 11]]> http://machinemachine.net/portfolio/exhibist-magazine-issue-11/

A selection of works from The 3D Additivist Cookbook were printed in issue 11 of Exhibist Magazine, including my essay Becoming Horror in The Plasticene. The magazine published in Turkey features interviews with media theorist and curator Ebru Yetişkin and Kristoffer Gansing, artistic director of transmediale festival. The current issue includes an essay by Ceylan Önalp titled ‘A Journey Through Time in Turkey’s New Media Art Scene’ featuring Ayşe Gül Süter, Ebru Kurbak, Can Büyükberber and Nihat Karataşlı and a selection of texts and projects from ‘The 3D Additivist Cookbook’ edited by Daniel Rourke and Morehshin Allahyari: Daniel Rourke’s ‘Becoming Horror in The Plasticene’; A Parede’s ‘Cheat Sheet for a Non- (or Less-) Colonialist Speculative Design’; Marija Bozinovska Jones + IYDES’ ‘Echoes of Earth: The Rocks of Us’; Symrin Chawla’s ‘Blood Bath’ curated by Browntourage for the 3D Additivist Cookbook The magazine introduces established artists working in the field of new media from Turkey such as Ali Miharbi, Erdal Inci, NOHlab, Pınar Yoldaş, Burak Arıkan and Refik Anadol and the work of artists and collectives such as Memo Akten, Selçuk Artut, Büşra Tunç, Ouchhh, DECOL, Iskele47, Osman Koç, Bager Akbay, Zeynep Nal Sezer, Uğur Engin Deniz, Epitome and Ozan Türkkan.

Interviews EVER ELUSIVE – A POST-DIGITAL INSTITUTION Tuce Erel talks to Kristoffer Gansing < Force Quit > + < Esc > = [ New Media Art ] Mine Kaplangı talks to Ebru Yetişkin Essays A JOURNEY THROUGH TIME IN TURKEY’S NEW MEDIA ART SCENE by Ceylan Önalp A SELECTION FROM THE 3D ADDITIVIST COOKBOOK Daniel Rourke, ‘Becoming Horror in The Plasticene’ A Parede, ‘Cheat Sheet for a Non- (or Less-) Colonialist Speculative Design’ Marija Bozinovska Jones + IYDES, ‘Echoes of Earth: The Rocks of Us’ Symrin Chawla, ‘Blood Bath’ curated by Browntourage for the 3D Additivist Cookbook

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Tue, 31 Jan 2017 03:51:36 -0800 http://machinemachine.net/portfolio/exhibist-magazine-issue-11/
<![CDATA[On the Far Side of the Marchlands (exhibition)]]> http://machinemachine.net/portfolio/on-the-far-side-of-the-marchlands/

On the Far Side of the Marchlands, Berlin (Feb 1st - March 26th)Exhibition opening Wednesday, February 1st (opening from 6pm) - March 26thErnst Schering Foundation> Facebook Event Page>

read more at: additivism.org/marchlands

with works by Morehshin Allahyari, Cathrine Disney, Keeley Haftner, Brittany Ransom and Daniel Rourke

A ‘marchland’ is a medieval term for a space between two or more realms; a zone betwixt the control of states, in which alternate rules of law and conduct might apply. On the Far Side of the Marchlands explores the potential of radically new topographies – “intertwined histories and overlapping territories” – composed of hybrid realms of experience, culture and materiality.

On the Far Side of the Marchlands - an exhibition and collaboration between Morehshin Allahyari, Cathrine Disney, Keeley Haftner, Brittany Ransom, and Daniel Rourke - speaks to the contemporary desire for transformation. The exhibition features a zoo of hybrid figures: from stupid/intelligent insects to short-sighted/forward-thinking posthumans; from chimera materials that ooze, respire and transmute, to murky politics impossible to clarify as either positive or negative. On the Far Side of the Marchlands expands on the material and conceptual hybridity expressed in The 3D Additivist Cookbook: a compendium of provocative projects by over one hundred artists, activists, and theorists concerned with ‘Additivist’ practices. The exhibition and Cookbook invite visitors to look beyond boundaries, speaking to a growing need for radical forms of transformation.The 3D Additivist Cookbook, conceived and edited by Daniel Rourke & Morehshin Allahyari, is also presented in the exhibition alien matter (Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2 February – 5 March 2017), curated by Inke Arns. On the Far Side of the Marchlands is a partner exhibition to the special exhibition alien matter, co-financed by Berlin LOTTO Foundation within the scope of ever elusive – thirty years of transmediale, supported by the British Council.

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Sat, 28 Jan 2017 11:33:00 -0800 http://machinemachine.net/portfolio/on-the-far-side-of-the-marchlands/
<![CDATA[Dark Matters]]> http://additivism.org/post/156087561093

Dark Matters Morehshin Allahyari left Iran in 2007 to pursue a critical artistic practice, choosing, in her words, ‘self-exile over self-censorship’.

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Thu, 19 Jan 2017 10:08:00 -0800 http://additivism.org/post/156087561093
<![CDATA[#Additivism at Transmediale 2017]]> http://additivism.org/post/155988053796

Additivism at Transmediale 2017Some details about #Additivism events coming up in Berlin as part of Transmediale Festival, 2017:On the Far Side of the Marchlands Wednesday, February 1st (opening from 6pm) - March 26thErnst Schering Foundation

with works by Morehshin Allahyari, Cathrine Disney, Keeley Haftner, Britt Ransom and Daniel Rourke

ever elusive - thirty years of transmedialeThursday, February 2nd (opening 7pm) - February 5thHouse of World Culturesalien matter (exhibition)

Thursday, February 2nd (opening 7pm) - March 3rd  House of World Culturesfeat. (#Additivism Cookbook) works by Joey Holder, Kuang-Yi Ku, Ami Drach and Dov Ganchrow3D Additivist Cookbook LaunchSaturday, February 4th, 6pmHouse of World Cultureswith Morehshin Allahyari, Miriam Rasch, Daniel Rourke, and invited Cookbook participantsSingularities (panel)Sunday, February 5th, 12pmHouse of World Cultureswith Morehshin Allahyari, Daniel Rourke, Dorothy Santos, Rasheedah Phillips, Luiza Prado & Pedro Oliveira (A Parede)Hope to see all your beautiful faces

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Tue, 17 Jan 2017 03:03:00 -0800 http://additivism.org/post/155988053796
<![CDATA[3D-Printing an Army of Forgotten Goddesses to Fight Colonialism]]> http://hyperallergic.com/346111/3d-printing-an-army-of-forgotten-goddesses-to-fight-colonialism/

When we think of powerful goddesses, the names of Athena, Artemis, Isis, or Kali may come to mind. Much less known, however, particularly to the Western world, are the names of such female figures of Middle-Eastern origin (those of ancient Egypt are a unique exception).

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Tue, 27 Dec 2016 10:09:47 -0800 http://hyperallergic.com/346111/3d-printing-an-army-of-forgotten-goddesses-to-fight-colonialism/
<![CDATA[On Material Entanglements: an Interview with Morehshin...]]> http://additivism.org/post/154581978099

On Material Entanglements: an Interview with Morehshin Allahyari Although we both live in the bay area, I got to Morehshin Allahyari’s work through an internet rabbit hole. Some months ago I picked up ‘Cyclonopedia’ by Reza Negarestani and got pretty engrossed by the book’s mix of fact and fiction. The story suggests that petrol functions as a lubricant necessary to spread an ancient evil throughout the world eventually leading into what he calls a desertification of the earth. a place where all will be flattened and ready for some sort of re-boot.

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Sat, 17 Dec 2016 00:52:00 -0800 http://additivism.org/post/154581978099
<![CDATA[Dorothy Santos, UC Santa Cruz // The Book as Cartography]]> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFnOACSrELw

The Book as Cartography: The Materialization of Digital and Imagined Spaces

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Fri, 09 Dec 2016 11:00:32 -0800 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFnOACSrELw